Bin Laden's victory: Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins is in today’s Guardian:

Osama bin Laden, in his wildest dreams, could hardly have hoped for this. A mere 18 months after he boosted the US to a peak of worldwide sympathy unprecedented since Pearl Harbor, that international goodwill has been squandered to near zero. Bin Laden must be beside himself with glee. And the infidels are now walking right into the Iraq trap.

As I pointed in my essay on the war, Dawkins makes a smiliar point:

The claim that this war is about weapons of mass destruction is either dishonest or betrays a lack of foresight verging on negligence. If war is so vitally necessary now, was it not at least worth mentioning in the election campaigns of 2000 and 2001? Why didn’t Bush and Blair mention the war to their respective electorates?

Crucially, Dawkins now goes on. Well known for his atheistic stance, Dawkins now brings religion into the fray.

Bush seems sincerely to see the world as a battleground between Good and Evil, St Michael’s angels against the forces of Lucifer. We’re gonna smoke out the Amalekites, send a posse after the Midianites, smite them all and let God deal with their souls. Minds doped up on this kind of cod theology have a hard time distinguishing between Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden. Some of Bush’s faithful supporters even welcome war as the necessary prelude to the final showdown between Good and Evil: Armageddon followed by the Rapture. We must presume, or at least hope, that Bush himself is not quite of that bonkers persuasion. But he really does seem to believe he is wrestling, on God’s behalf, against some sort of spirit of Evil.

His argument continues, and addressing the America people he says, along the same lines as Michael Moore.

My American friends, you know I love your country, how have we come to this? Yes, yes, Bush isn’t quite as stupid as he sounds, and heaven knows he can’t be as stupid as he looks. I know most of you didn’t vote for him anyway, but that is my point. Forgive my presumption, but could it just be that there is something a teeny bit wrong with that famous constitution of yours? Of course this particular election was unusual in being a dead heat. Elections don’t usually need a tie-breaker, something equivalent to the toss of a coin. Al Gore’s majority in the country, reinforcing his majority in the electoral college but for dead-heated Florida, would have led a just and unbiased supreme court to award him the tie-breaker. So yes, Bush came to power by a kind of coup d’état. But it was a constitutional coup d’état. The system has been asking for trouble for years.

He concludes, brilliantly – and I agree with him:

Saddam Hussein has been a catastrophe for Iraq, but he never posed a threat outside his immediate neighbourhood. George Bush is a catastrophe for the world. And a dream for Bin Laden.